"The Invisible Girls: A Memoir"

by Sarah Thebarge

 

 

Maroon Edition

The Maroon Edition book selection for 2014 is The Invisible Girls: A Memoir by Sarah Thebarge.  We hope that all of next fall’s incoming freshmen—and many of you—will read the book before the fall semester begins and participate in related activities planned for next academic year.  Ms. Thebarge is scheduled to speak at this fall’s inaugural Freshmen Fall Convocation on August 19.

Sarah Thebarge grew up as a pastor’s kid in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.  She earned a master’s degree in medical science from Yale School of Medicine and was studying journalism at Columbia University when she was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 27.

Invisible Girls chronicles her diagnosis, two years of treatment that left her an emotional and physical wreck, and drastic changes in her career plans and relationships as she relocated to Oregon in an effort to put her life back together.  In Portland, unexpected involvement with a struggling refugee mother and daughters from Somalia—people who were “invisible” in their own neighborhood—led Sarah to better understand and overcome the devastation in her own derailed life and to realize that she too had been an “invisible girl.”

This powerful story helps readers see the world around us with new eyes.  I believe you will find reading ittime well spent.  Sarah Thebarge’s writing has also appeared in Just Between Us, Relevant, and Christianity Today, and her blog was featured on MSNBC.com.

All of our incoming freshmen who attend an Orientation session this spring or summer will receive a copy of The Invisible Girls: A Memoir. It will be available to everyone through Barnes & Noble on campus and from many other bookstores and on-line booksellers.  This site will have more information about related events and activities. 

Thanks to the members of the Maroon Edition Committee for an excellent selection for this upcoming sixth year of our common reading program. 

Mark E. Keenum
President


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We do not learn for school, but for life. -- Seneca